Limbek, Nyman, Snider, Karllstrom, Domander

February 17, 2016

Yai Limbek

  • Yai Limbek, a seaman from Dago (Hiiumaa) Island in Estonia, worked in Perth as a labourer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 11th Battalion on the Western Front. He was wounded in the face at Bullecourt in April 1917, experienced delusional insanity and was repatriated to Australia.
  • After the war, in 1919, he was employed on the railway, but disappears from the records after that.

Julius Ivar Edmund Nyman

  • Julius Ivar Edmund Nyman came to Australia with his parents in 1899; they were followers of the charismatic Finnish leader Matti Kurikka, who tried to establish a Utopian community in Australia. Julius grew up in Yandina in Queensland, working as a carpenter and postal mechanic.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Warwick, he served with the 49th Battalion on the Western Front. In June 1917 he was wounded in the arm at Messines and in the leg at Polygon Wood in September 1917. After the second casualty he was repatriated to Australia.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Hilda Frances Ward, and lived in Warwick working as a postal electrician.

Alexander Snider

  • Alexander Snider from Kramkowa in Poland worked as a machine-man in Kurri Kurri, most likely in the mines there.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in West Maitland, he served with the 34th Battalion on the Western Front; in 1918 he was transferred the Australian Army Ordnance Corps and awarded the Meritorious Service Medal for efficient service there.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Ella Mackenzie, and lived in Ryde, working as a machinist. His son Alexander Matheson Snider served in the AIF in WWII.

Gunnar Karllstrom

  • Gunnar Karllstrom, a Finn from Helsingfors (Helsinki), came to Australia in 1910 and worked as a labourer in Korumburra, Melbourne, and Ballarat. Already after enlistment in the army he married an Australian girl, Margaret Hanratty, and had a son.
  • He went with the 39th Battalion to the Western Front in November 1916 and died of wounds in January 1917.
  • When news about his death reached Ballarat, the flags on the City and Town Halls were flown at half-mast.

Charles Domander

  • Charles Domander, a Finn from Abo (Turku), came to South Australia in 1898 and worked as a fisherman in Port Adelaide.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 48th Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he continued working on his boat ‘Anna’ on the South Australian Coast.