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Samuel Waxman


Alias Shmul Vaksman (in consular letter)

Born 17.06.1896

Place Warsaw, Poland

Ethnic origin Jewish

Religion Jewish

Father Lazor (Leizer) Waxman

Family

Wife Leah Waxman (née Peskin), married 1923; children David Waxman b. 1923, Ramon Baron b. 1928, Barbara Joan b. 1932, Ronald Lawrence b. 1935

Arrived at Australia
from Warsaw
on 1912
per Norseman
disembarked at Melbourne

Residence before enlistment Melbourne

Occupation 1916 salesman, 1919 draper, 1928 merchant

Service
service number 5905
enlisted 7.08.1916
POE Melbourne
unit 24th Battalion
rank Private
place Western Front, 1917-1919
casualties WIA (gassed) 1918
final fate RTA 6.10.1919
discharged 26.02.1920

Naturalisation 1920

Residence after the war Melbourne, Adelaide

Died 30.03.1942, South Australia

Materials

Digitised naturalisation (NAA)

Digitised service records (NAA)

Digitised Embarkation roll entry (AWM)

Personal case file 1 2(NAA)

Intelligence section file (NAA)

Spry, H E & another v Waxman, S & others (digitised file) (NAA)

Waxman's Fashion House, accounts (NAA)

Blog article

Russian

English

From Russian Anzacs in Australian History:

Samuel Waxman had his own business, too, and he had also worked at Myer's, but before his enlistment: 'He apparently did it by direct approach to Sidney Myer and as a result got a job', according to Waxman's son. 'They both spoke Yiddish to each other. Sidney Myer in those early days had a much more direct connection with his staff before he grew so big.' That experience helped Waxman when it came to starting his own business, as his son relates. 'I believe he went into manufacturing of clothing in South Australia for a short time and then opened a suburban clothing shop and had a bankruptcy. Then he opened a fashion shop in Randell Street, which was the only shopping street of Adelaide City in the 1930s. And that shop survived until 1980. ... I can remember my mother saying she was down to one dress [during the depression], so it was obviously very hard, but they survived somehow. You can say that he prospered without becoming immensely rich.'