Sauvola, Miller, Anderson, Shilony, Hofdahl

September 17, 2017

Carl Gustav Sauvola

  • Carl Gustav Sauvola, a Finnish seaman from Brahestad (Raahe), came to South Australia in 1904 and worked as a labourer and later as an ‘electrical labourer’. In 1908 he married an Australian girl, Emily Louisa Kerr; their first children were born in Port Adelaide, but after the death of their two daughters they moved to Melbourne.
  • Carl enlisted in the AIF in Melbourne, but was transferred to the home service, 3rd District Guard Corps – by that time he was 40 years old. In December 1918 he was discharged, but in January 1919 enlisted for home service in the Central Flying School, Laverton.
  • After the war he lived with his family in Melbourne, working as a fitter’s labourer.

Alfred Miller

  • Alfred Miller, a Polish man from Lodz, was a motor mechanic by trade. He came to Western Australia in 1914 and later moved to Adelaide.
  • He tried to enlist in the AIF in October 1916, but was rejected because of defective vision. Enlisting in August 1917 in Adelaide, he was allocated to the Army Medical Corps, but was discharged in December 1917, getting the position of an instructor for motor and electrical work for returned men.
  • In 1920-1921 he travelled all over Australia in search of work and finally settled in Melbourne.

Charles Anderson

  • Charles Anderson, a Finnish seaman, came to Australia in 1914 and worked as a miner.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Nymagee, NSW, he served with the 2nd Tunnelling Company on the Western Front. In October 1918, during the advance on the Hindenburg Line, he was wounded in the arm and returned to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney.

Jack Shilony

  • Jack Shilony enlisted in the AIF as a ‘Russian Jew’; in one case he stated he was born in Jerusalem in Palestine, in another case, in Marseilles in France. Most likely he grew up in Palestine, where his parents were living. He came to Western Australia in 1913 and was working as a moulder apprentice. In 1916-1917 he worked as a ward orderly in Perth Public Hospital.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Perth, he served with the 10th Field Ambulance on the Western Front.
  • After the war he stayed in Perth, working as a hospital attendant and later as a laundry man. In 1925 he married Julie Staricoff. After his wife’s death in 1937 he married Olga Rosenberg. Retiring, he moved to Melbourne in the late 1970s.

Emil Everd Hofdahl

  • Emil Everd Hofdahl, a Finnish seaman from Tammerfors (Tampere), came to Australia in 1916, deserting his ship.
  • He tried to enlist in October 1916, but was not successful. He was accepted at the second attempt, in August 1917, and was sent to work to the Australian General Hospital as an orderly. In April 1918 suspicions arouse that he was a German, although he stated that he did not know the German language, and he was discharged.
  • After the war he continued serving as a seaman.

Nevola, Nelson, Ospovat, Luoma, Wicks

September 13, 2017

Jacob Nevola

  • Jacob Nevola, a Finnish seaman from Wasa (Vaasa), came to South Australia in 1914.
  • In 1916 he twice enlisted in the AIF, but was discharged because of drunkenness. His third attempt, in July 1917, was successful and he served with the 50th Battalion on the Western Front. In June 1918 he was wounded in the knee, but rejoined his battalion.
  • Before leaving for the front he married an Australian woman, Alice Newton, and lived in South Australia, working as a labourer and gardener. He had a number of convictions because of drunkenness, especially after his wife’s death in 1934, and tragically drowned in the Murray River while drinking with a group of swagmen.

John Henry Nelson

  • John Henry Nelson, a Finnish seaman from Helsingfors (Helsinki), came to South Australia in December 1916 and worked in the smelters and on coasting crafts.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Port Adelaide, he served with the 48th Battalion on the Western Front. A month after his arrival to the front, in May 1918, he was wounded in the right hand, losing four fingers. The ship Barunga, on which he was returning to Australia, was torpedoed by the Germans, but he survived.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Vera Constance Hooper, and lived in Adelaide, working as a labourer.

Hyam Ospovat

  • Hyam Ospovat, a Jewish man from Dvinsk (now Daugavpils, Latvia), grew up in England and was working on the ships as a steward. In May 1917 he came to Australia.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in Newcastle in July, but was discharged soon after as medically unfit.
  • In 1918 he married an Australian girl, Ella Ada Hughes, and had a son. He could not find employment and, while in Queensland, drowned in 1920 while crossing the flooded Flinders River.

Bruno Luoma

  • Bruno Luoma was a Finnish seaman from Abo (Turku).
  • He enlisted in the AIF in Tasmania, but was discharged soon after, probably because of his lack of naturalisation.
  • After the war he continued seafaring and left for the USA.

Frank Joseph Wicks

  • Frank Joseph Wicks was born in St Petersburg or Warsaw; by the time of his enlistment in the AIF he was working as a labourer in Queensland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Charleville, Queensland, he served with the Tunnelling Corps as a sapper on the Western Front.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Mary Parkinson, and lived with his family in Bendigo, working as a labourer. During WWII he joined the AIF again.

Evanoff, Weckman, Hendrickson, Wiselenski

September 10, 2017

John Evanoff

  • John Evanoff (served as Jacob Evonoff), a Russian seaman from Novo Dilizhan, in Elizavetpol Province in the Caucasus (now Armenia), came to Australia in April 1917 and enlisted in Sydney two months later.
  • He served with the 53rd Battalion on the Western Front. In April 1918, two weeks after his arrival at the front, he was gassed, but continued his service. In September 1918, at the battle for Peronne, he was wounded in the leg and repatriated to Australia.
  • In 1919, soon after his discharge from the army, he married an Australian girl, Catherine Mary Lindbeck, and lived with his family in Sydney working as a labourer for the Water Board Department, and later as a miner.

Walter Alen Weckman

  • Walter Alen Weckman, a Finnish seaman from Vyborg, deserted his ship due to cruel treatment from the captain soon after their arrival at Fremantle in February 1917.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in July 1917, and served with the 51st Battalion on the Western Front. In July 1918 he fell ill and was evacuated to England; on 9 November 1918, two day before the Armistice, he died of pneumonia.
  • His relatives in Finland were found after the war.

John Edward Hendrickson

  • John Edward Hendrickson, a Finnish seaman from Abo (Turku), enlisted in the AIF in Fremantle in July 1917 together with Weckman.
  • Three months later he was discharged as medically unfit.
  • No records about his life after the war have been found.

Peter Wiselenski

  • Peter Wiselenski came from a peasant family in Slonim, Belarus. Leaving his home as a teenager, he spent five years in the USA, came to Brisbane in July 1917 and enlisted in the AIF a week later as Pete Wishkenlski.
  • He served with the 2nd Tunnelling Company on the Western Front as a sapper.
  • Returning to Australia, he married an Australian girl, Mary Eliza Revell. They took a land block in the soldiers’ settlement of Red Cliff, Victoria, where Peter worked as a farmer. Their son Peter Kelvin served in the AIF in WWII and Peter elder served in the volunteer defense corps.

Kopin, Carlsson, Hildon, Larson

September 1, 2017

Alexis Kopin

  • Alexis Kopin, a Polish carpenter, came to Brisbane from the Russian Far East in 1912. He worked in the cane-cutting areas of Central Queensland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne in June 1917, he was sent to the Machine Gun Company for training. Two months later he asked to be discharged or to be transferred to the infantry, which raised his commanders’ suspicions.
  • Finally he was discharged, applied for a passport from the Russian consul, and left for Russia in December 1917.

Sven Eugen Carlsson

  • Sven Eugen Carlsson, a Finnish seaman from Helsingfors (Helsinki), came to Australia in December 1916.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne, he served with the 7th Battalion on the Western Front. In April 1918 he was wounded in the head, but recovered and returned to his battalion in August 1918. Two weeks later he was gassed, but survived. He was awarded Bronze Medal for his service.
  • He was discharged from the army in London in July 1919 and his life after that is unknown.

Alexander Hildon

  • Alexander Hildon, a Finnish seaman from Oulu, came to Western Australia in about 1909 and worked as a farm hand in the Fremantle area.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in June 1917, he was allocated to the 2nd Pioneer Battalion, but departed for the front only a year later. He was still in England when the war ended, but he was sent to the Western Front after that.
  • After the war he lived in Fremantle, working as a labourer.

John Edward Larson

  • John Edward Larson, a Finnish seaman from Kotka, came to Western Australia in 1906 and worked in the country as a labourer. He married an Australian girl, Rebecca Mary Beard, and had three children.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Perth, he served as a sapper with the 44th Battalion and the 11th Field Company Engineers on the Western Front.
  • After the war he lived in Fremantle, working as a labourer. He died early, in 1928, leaving 7 young children.

Rothberg, Shulcosky, Wendell, Tornroos, Carlson

August 27, 2017

Max Rothberg

  • Max Rothberg, a Jewish man from Bessarabia, after spending several years in Canada and England, came to Australia in 1913 and worked in Melbourne as a carpenter, living with his partner Sarah Spitallnic and their children.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 1st Field Company Engineers on the Western Front.
  • After the war he moved to Brisbane, where he married Doris Elizabeth Mary Mellor and continued working as a carpenter. In the 1940s and 1950s he worked in Port Moresby in New Guinea.

Tony Shulcosky

  • Tony Shulcosky, a Polish man from Suwalki Province, came to Australia from America in 1904. By the time of his enlistment in the AIF he was living in Armidale, working as a labourer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 36th Battalion on the Western Front as a Lewis gunner. In April 1918, at Amiens, he was wounded in the leg and repatriated to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in country NSW, working as a labourer.

Leander Ludwig Wendell

  • Leander Ludwig Wendel, a Finn from Abo (Turku), spending several years in the USA and England, came to Australia in 1915. He settled in Newcastle, where he married Edith Albertina Hambley, a widow with eight children, and worked as a motor driver.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served as a sapper with the 14th Field Company Engineers on the Western Front. In November 1918 he was accidentally injured and returned to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Newcastle and Sydney, working with NSW Railways as a fitter, motor driver and later as a carpenter and bridge carpenter.

Arvo Malakiias Tornroos

  • Arvo Malakiias Tornroos, a Finnish seaman from Rauma, came to Melbourne in 1913 and worked at Leongatha as a farm hand.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne, he served with the 24th Battalion on the Western Front. In July 1918 he was gassed, but recovered and returned to his battalion. In October 1918 he was killed in the attack on the Hindenburg Line.
  • His family was found in Finland after the war.

Carl Carlson

  • Carl Carlson, a Finnish seaman from Abo (Turku), was working as a labourer in South Australia.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Port Pirie, he served with the 48th Battalion on the Western Front. He got sick after a month at the front, was repatriated to Australia, and died in Melbourne soon after his return to Australia.

Green, Lauren, Peterson, Steinberg, Hanson

August 24, 2017

Michael Green

  • Michael Green, a Finnish seaman from Helsingfors (Helsinki), came to South Australia in 1895 and by the time of his enlistment in the AIF worked as a wharf labourer and sailmaker.
  • Enlisting in Port Augusta in May 1917, he was discharged five months later as ‘overage’ (he was 45 by that time).
  • It was not possible to trace his life after the war.

Karl Walter Wilhelm Lauren

  • Karl Walter Wilhelm Lauren, a Finn from Abo (Turku), came to Australia in about 1910 and was working as a labourer in South Australia.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Adelaide he served with the 43rd Battalion on the Western Front. In July 1918 he was severely wounded and died of wounds a day later.
  • His mother was found after the war in Finland.

Gustaf Adolph Peterson

  • Gustaf Adolph Peterson, a Finnish carpenter from Vyborg, settled in Newcastle and married an Australian girl Johanna Kelly in 1907; they had five children. By the time of his enlistment in the AIF he was living in Brisbane.
  • He enlisted for the first time in November 1916 and was allocated to the Naval Bridging Train. In May 1917, when the unit was disbanded, he reenlisted and served as a sapper with the 8th Field Company Engineers on Western Front.
  • After the war he moved to Sydney, where he continued working as a carpenter. His sons Gustave Reinhold and Eric served in the AIF in WWII.

Jack Steinberg

  • Jack Steinberg, a Jewish man from Odessa or Brest, worked in Perth as a cabinet maker. He was married.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in May 1917, but was discharged two months later for medical reasons.
  • After the war he lived in Brisbane. In 1944 he committed suicide.

Hugo Hanson

  • Hugo Hanson, a Finnish seaman from Lovisa, came to Australia in about 1915.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney, he served with the 17th Battalion on the Western Front. In August 1918 he was killed at the Amiens advance.
  • His family was found in Finland after the war.

Tosold, Gershen, Wald, Uscinski

August 22, 2017

John Tosold

  • John Tosold, from the Austro-Hungarian Empire, at enlistment in the AIF posed as a native of ‘Russian Poland’. He was a sailor and came to Australia in 1906, working as a labourer in South and Western Australia. When the war broke out he tried to naturalise, but was rejected. In 1915 he was arrested and interned as an enemy, but stated that he was naturalised in the USA and was released.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in Port Lincoln in South Australia in May 1917 as a Russian subject, but was discharged a month later and interned as a POW.
  • In 1919 he was deported to Austria, where he married and returned to Australia in 1927 with his wife Hanna and two daughters. He worked as a farmhand and contractor and for years tried to naturalise in Australia, until he finally succeeded in 1946.

Morris Gershen

  • Morris Gershen, a Jewish man from Russian Poland, came to England in his youth and emigrated to Western Australia in 1908. He worked as a tailor in Boulder City and Kalgoorlie, marrying a local girl, Ethel May Temby, in 1915.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 16th Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he received some vocational training in England and, returning to Australia, opened a successful business, first in Moora and then in Geraldton.

Alfred Wald

  • Alfred Wald, a Finn from Mariehamn, worked in Western Australia as a farmhand.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Bunbury, he served with the 16th Battalion on the Western Front. In August 1918 he was wounded in the ear, but returned to his battalion two weeks later.
  • After the war he lived in country areas of Western Australia, working as a farm worker and labourer.

Vincent Uscinski

  • Vincent Uscinski, a Polish man born in Ostrow, came to Australia with his parents and siblings in 1911 from Harbin, where the family had spent several years. They settled in Brisbane, where Vincent worked as a sign writer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 41st Battalion on the Western Front.
  • He died in an accident in 1921 upon his return to Australia.

Puhakka, Kipman M., Kipman S., Mikolaizyk, Danoff

August 18, 2017

Matti Puhakka

  • Matti Puhakka, a Finnish seaman from Oulu, came to Australia in 1910 and worked as a horse driver.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Brisbane, he served with the 47th and 49th battalions on the Western Front. In March 1918 he was wounded in the forearm, but returned to the front after his recovery.
  • After the war he married in Finland and brought his wife Hulda Katherina Pulkkenen to Australia. They lived first in Melbourne and then in Sydney, while Matti continued working as a seaman. In 1936 he was accidentally killed aboard the SS Wanganella.

Maximilian Kipman

  • Maximilian Kipman came from a well-off, cultured Polish family; he was born Copenhagen, Denmark, while his parents were travelling in Europe. Spending some time in Switzerland and England, he came to Australia in November 1914 together with his younger brother Stanley Kipman. They settled in Sydney and worked as cashiers.
  • Maximilian volunteered to the army but was rejected; on the 5th of May 1917 he was accepted as a member of the clerical staff, working in the Quartermaster section of Liverpool camp. He also worked in the Censor’s staff as an interpreter. In July 1917 he was discharged in order to join AIF. He was allocated to the Engineer Officers Training School, but discharged two months later. One the reasons for this could have been denunciations of his ‘pro-German’ sympathies sent in by the members of the public.
  • After the war Maximilian worked as a piano tuner in Sydney and NSW; later he became a liqueur salesman. In 1922 he married Henrietta Christina Mclean, whom he later divorced. His second wife, Florence Hooke, died due to an attempted abortion.

Stanley Kipman

  • Stanley (Stanislaus) Kipman, the younger brother of Maximilian, was born in Warsaw, travelled all over Europe and came to Australia in 1914.
  • He applied to enlist in the AIF in 1914, 1915, and 1916, but was rejected for medical reasons. Finally, like his brother, he was accepted in the Quartermaster section of Liverpool camp. After two months he was discharged to join the AIF. He was accepted to Home service and posted to the wireless section, but was discharged in January 1918 as medically unfit. The denunciations against his brother could have affected his army career as well.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney, working as a piano tuner. In the late 1920s he moved to the USA, where he settled in Oakland, California.

Victor Ivan Mikolaizyk

  • Victor Ivan Mikolaizyk, a seaman of Russian-Estonian background, came to Australia in 1913 and worked in Sydney as a winch driver.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 2nd Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he continued his occupation as a seaman.

Jacob Danoff

  • Jacob Danoff, a Russian seaman from Levaia Rossosh in Central Russia, came to Australia in 1913 and worked as a labourer. He was active in the radical Russian community in Brisbane.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Brisbane, he was allocated to the Mining Corps reinforcements, but discharged the next year because of ‘mental disease’.
  • He died in 1923 in Sydney.

Kiviselg, Stuhrit, Rautio, Brining, Pavoloff

August 13, 2017

Alexander Kiviselg

  • Alexander Kiviselg, an Estonian seaman from Pärnu, came to Australia in April 1917 and enlisted a few days later.
  • Enlisting in Sydney, he served with the 3rd Battalion on the Western Front. In September 1918, during the advance south of Perone, he was severely wounded in the leg, arm, head and shoulder.
  • Recovering, he returned to Australia, but died as the result of an accident in September 1919.

Alexander Stuhrit

  • Alexander Stuhrit, a Latvian from Libava (Liepaja), claimed to serve for 4 years in the American Navy. In February 1917 he worked on ships in South Australia as a donkey-man. He got into trouble with the police for assault and soon afterwards enlisted in the AIF.
  • He served as a sapper with the 3rd Tunnelling Company on the Western Front.
  • While in Scotland, he married Agnes Aitken, but returned to Australia on his own, and after a number of further assaults and troubles with the law, left for the USA. He married there and worked on American ships.

John Rautio

  • John Rautio, a Finn from Oulu, came to Australia in 1890 and worked as a gardener in Sydney.
  • He enlisted in the AIF, but was discharged four months later as being ‘overage’ (he was 46 years old by that time).
  • His trail disappears after the war.

William Brining

  • William Brining, a Latvian seaman from Riga, enlisted in the AIF in Newcastle.
  • He served with the 36th and 34th battalions on the Western Front. He was killed on 31 August 1918 at the battle for Peronne.
  • His mother in Riga was found after the war and received an Australian pension.

George Pavoloff

  • George Pavoloff was born in the St Petersburg area and came to Australia 1916, working as a barber and hairdresser.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Grafton, he served with the 1st Battalion on the Western Front. In March 1918 he was gassed and in September 1918, during the advance south of Peronne, was wounded in the leg.
  • After the war he returned to Australia, but no information can be found after that time.

Hemming, Kinninen, Anderson, Michelson

August 8, 2017

Hemming Karl Hemming

  • Hemming Karl Hemming, a Finnish seaman from Abo (Turku), by the time of his enlistment lived in Melbourne, working as a turner.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he sailed with the 1st Pioneer Battalion for the Western Front, but became sick while in Liverpool and was returned to Australia.
  • He died in 1924 in Heidelberg, Victoria.

Kaarl Kinninen

  • Kaarl Kinninen, a Finnish seaman, enlisted in the AIF in Perth.
  • He served with the 11th Battalion on the Western Front. In August 1918, during the Amiens advance, he was wounded in the leg and shoulder and repatriated to Australia.
  • After the war he returned to Western Australia and received a pension in 1920, but disappears from the records after that.

Harry Anderson

  • Harry Anderson, a Finn from Helsingfors (Helsinki), was farming in Western Australia.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Perth, he served with the 10th Light Horse Regiment in Egypt.
  • After the war he returned to Western Australia.

John Victor Michelson

  • John Victor Michelson, a Latvian seaman, came to South Australia in 1912. He settled on Witera Station near Talia, working as a farm hand.
  • In April 1917 he enlisted in the AIF in Adelaide, and married Mary Irene White, a girl from Milang, a few months later; their first child was born when he was serving in the AIF overseas. He served with the 3rd Light Horse Regiment in Egypt.
  • After the war he took up farming in Olive Hill and Cungena, West Coast of South Australia, working as a carpenter and contractor. He and his wife raised a large family and two of their children served in the AIF in WWII. John himself enlisted in the AIF and served in a garrison battalion. After the war he was the president of the local sub-branch of the R.S.L. in Milang.