Kouvaldin, Bridihin, Bowson, Doposky

March 14, 2017

Alexis Kouvaldin

  • Alexis Kouvaldin, a Russian seaman from Moscow, served for 5 years in the Russian Navy before he came to Australia in 1916.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney, he served with the Australian Broad Gauge Railway Operating Company on the Western Front.
  • After the war lived in Newcastle, working in the port.

Alexis Bridihin

  • Alexis Bridihin, a Russian blacksmith from Orel, came to Brisbane via the Russian Far East in 1911. He found employment at the Ipswich railway workshops. His wife Tatiana and their children joined him four months later.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Ipswich, he was allocated to the Australian Broad Gauge Railway Operating Company, where Alexis Kouvaldin was also serving. He served on the Western Front to the end of the war.
  • After the war the Bridihin family with three young children moved to Wamuran, where they were engaged in growing fruit. Being among the first settlers, they had a local road named after them as Bridihin’s Road. Their youngest son Alexis was killed in a tragic accident when he was sixteen, while the elder son Boris served in the AIF during WWII in New Guinea.

Abraham Bowson

  • Abraham Bowson, a Jewish man from Lomza in Poland, came to Australia in 1907. By the time of his enlistment in the AIF he married to a woman named Jetta and was working as a dealer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney, he served with the 3rd Battalion on the Western Front. In April 1918, at the battle for Hazebrouck, he was wounded in the foot and back, and was returned to Australia.
  • After the war he worked as a baker and cook. During WWII he enlisted and served in a garrison battalion.

Samuel Doposky

  • Samuel Doposky was probably Jewish. He came from Warsaw in Poland and worked at a smelter in South Australia.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in Adelaide, but deserted two days later.
  • He stayed in Australia after the war, being listed among passengers travelling from Melbourne to Brisbane in 1928. Any other records about him have not been found so far.

Kallio, Kataja, Nyland, Lazarus

March 12, 2017

Evert Aleksanter Kallio

  • Evert Aleksanter Kallio, a Finnish seaman from Abo, came to Brisbane in January 1917 and enlisted in the AIF a few days later.
  • He served with the 2nd Light Horse Regiment in Egypt.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Mildred May, and lived with his family in Brisbane, working as a labourer. He got sick with TB and died in 1936, leaving seven young children.

John Kataja

  • John Kataja, a Finnish seaman from Wasa, enlisted in the AIF together with Kallio.
  • They served together with the 2nd Light Horse Regiment in Egypt.
  • After the war he returned to Finland and served in the Karelian Guard Regiment there.

William Nyland

  • William Nyland, a Finnish seaman from Abo, came to Newcastle in 1912 and worked as a mechanic in the mines.
  • He enlisted in the AIF in West Maitland, but was discharged as medically unfit three months later.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Ethel, and lived with his family in Newcastle, working as a miner. Their elder son and daughter served in the AIF during WWII.

Isaac Lazarus

  • Isaac Lazarus, a Jewish man from ‘Nienstaught, Russia’ (most likely this was Taurage in Lithuania) came to Australia around 1890. First he took up peddling in South Australia, where he married Johanna Boon in 1894. Soon after that they moved to Ballarat and then to Bendigo, where he worked as a dealer. They had eight children and three of his sons born in Australia served in the AIF.
  • Although he was in his forties, Isaac enlisted in the AIF and sailed with the 58th Battalion to England, from where he was returned to Australia because of old age.
  • After the war he was engaged in poultry and pig farming and the family supplemented their income by keeping a boarding house.

Orgeson, Soderholm, Erickson

March 10, 2017

Christian Orgeson

  • Christian Orgeson, a seaman from Estonia, had a Danish father and a Finnish mother. He came to Sydney in 1917 and worked as a sailmaker.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the 35th Battalion on the Western Front. A month after his arrival, at the battle for Broodseinde near Ypres, he was wounded in the hand and returned to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney working as motor mechanic, but in the 1920s he moved to America, continuing his occupation of a seaman.

Otto Harold Soderholm

  • Otto Harold Soderholm, a Finnish seaman from Abo, came to Australia in 1914 and worked in Victoria as a farm labourer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Warrnambool, he served with the 21st Battalion on the Western Front. In July 1918, being affected by a gas shell explosion, he left his unit and was court martialled, but the sentence was remitted and he was sent back to the trenches.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Nellie Doreen Shepherdson, and lived with his family in Fish Creek and Alberton, Victoria, working at a cheese factory. During WWII he served in the garrison battalion.

John Konrad Erickson

  • John Konrad Erickson, a Finnish seaman, enlisted in the New Zealand Expeditionary Force in Trentham, New Zealand, and served in Gallipoli. Falling ill, he was returned to New Zealand and came to Australia.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Port Pirie, he sailed with the 10th Battalion to the Western Front, but became ill in England and was returned to Australia.
  • After the discharge, in March 1918, he sailed to the USA, where he registered as a native of Sweden for Army service there. His trail disappears after that.

Bell, Krauklys, Lundfend, Prinz

March 9, 2017

Isaak Bell

  • Isaak Bell, a Jewish man from Krasnoiarsk in Siberia, came to Australia in 1909 and worked as a watchmaker in Melbourne.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he arrived with the 21st Battalion on the Western Front, but three months later, being mistreated by other soldiers, he left his unit, was caught and court martialled. He had resolved not to stay in his unit, had a self-inflicted wound, and then left the unit again. After he was caught the cycle continued, with another court martial, a self-wounding, AWL, and a new court martial. After the war his term was suspended and he was finally returned to Australia.
  • After the war he married and lived in Sydney, working on the wharves.

John Robert Krauklys

  • John Robert Krauklys, a Latvian seaman from Riga, came to Sydney in January 1917 and enlisted three days later.
  • He came to the Western Front with the 18th battalion, but was later transferred to the 37th Battalion, where his cousin Ian Rosing served. He was killed in August 1918 at the battle for Peronne, being mentioned in dispatches for his bravery.

Wilhelm Lundfend

  • Wilhelm Lundfend, another Latvian seaman from Riga, came to Australia in 1916 and enlisted in the AIF together with Krauklys.
  • He served with the 18th Battalion on the Western Front. After several AWLs, he was wounded in the hand in August 1918 and was returned to Australia.
  • While in England he married Clara Maud Millbood, but his wife did not follow him to Australia, where he lived in Sydney, working as a cleaner.

Carl August Prinz

  • Carl August Prinz, a Latvian seaman from Vindava (Ventspils), came to Australia in 1909 and enlisted together with Krauklys and Lundfend.
  • He served with the 18th Battalion on the Western Front to the very end of the war.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney and then in Launceston, working as a carpenter.

Goldberg, Platkin, Hocklind, Odenberg

March 8, 2017

John Goldberg

  • John Goldberg, a Jewish man from Grodno in Belarus, came to Australia in 1904, at the age of 14, to join his relatives there. He lived in outback New South Wales, in Gundagai, Harden, Adelong, Burrowa, and Dubbo, working as a draper, running a shop with his brother George.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney, he arrived in England with the reinforcements to the 36th Battalion. He developed nephritis and was returned to Australia, where he served in a medical unit.
  • After the war he married Nellie Rosenberg and lived in Sydney, working as a fruiterer and carrier.

Haim Platkin

  • Haim Platkin, a Jewish man from Rogachev in Belarus, emigrated to England at the end of the nineteenth century. He worked as a theatrical manager and came to Australia in June 1914 with The Cherniawsky Brothers, a group of Russian-Jewish instrumentalists.
  • After participating in fundraising for patriotic endeavours, he enlisted in the AIF himself. He was sent to the N.C.O. school and Duntroon College, but, boycotted by other servicemen as a ‘Russian’, he went to the front with an artillery unit. While in England he applied for transfer to the 42nd Battalion (Jewish) of the Imperial Army.
  • After the war he lived in Syria, running ‘Anzac Harry’s Bar’.

Oscar Hocklind

  • Oscar Hocklind, a Finnish seaman and blacksmith from Helsingfors (Helsinki), most likely came to Australia during the war.
  • He enlisted in the AIF with another Baltic seaman, Adolf Odenberg. A week later he was discharged and continued sailing, working on American vessels.

Adolf Odenberg

  • Adolf Odenberg, an Estonian seaman and blacksmith from Tallinn, came to Australia in November 1916.
  • Two months later he enlisted in the army, but was discharged soon afterwards.
  • During the following year he sailed in Australian American waters, and died in 1918 in San Francisco.

Trinkoon, Seuff, Gusaroff, Kairi

February 12, 2017

Jack Trinkoon

  • Jack Trinkoon, a young man from a Russian-Polish family from Riga, came to Brisbane with his parents and siblings in 1911. He worked as a station hand, and then as a carpenter in Brisbane.
  • He first enlisted when he was just 17 in December 1915, but got into trouble and was discharged after being court martialled for desertion. As soon as he was released, he re-enlisted again and served in Egypt with the 14th Australian General Hospital.
  • After the war he lived in Brisbane, working as a cabinetmaker and motor body builder. In 1921 he married an Australian girl, Matilda Jane Stokes. Their son Thomas John served in the AIF during WWII.

Samuel Seuff

  • Samuel Seuff, a Jewish man from Shiauliai in Lithuania, visited Australia during the war as a seaman.
  • He first enlisted in the AIF in January 1916, but was discharged a few days later. During the next visit in December 1916 he enlisted again and was sent to Europe with the 45th battalion. While aboard the ship he attempted to commit suicide and was returned to Australia and discharged.
  • Upon return he lived in Sydney, working as a wharf labourer.

Alexander Gusaroff

  • Alexander Gusaroff came from a family of tugboat pilots, in Lebiazh’e near St Petersburg. He worked on English ships, landing in Australia in October 1916.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney he served with the 55th Battalion on the Western Front suffering heavy wounds to his legs during the Hindenburg Line Offensive in September 1918.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney working as a labourer.

Andrew Kairi

  • Andrew Kairi, a Latvian seaman from Libava (Liepaja), came to Western Australia in 1916 and enlisted in the AIF.
  • He sailed with the 44th Battalion to the Western Front, but was diagnosed with tuberculosis while in England and returned to Australia.
  • After the war he had some troubles with law as a result of drunken brawls in pubs and succumbed to death in 1926.

Petterson, Myllymaki, Evert, Tkachuk

January 3, 2017

Karl Petterson

  • Karl Petterson, an Estonian seaman from Revel (Tallinn), came to South Australia in 1910 and worked as a labourer on wharves in Port Adelaide, later moving to Sydney. He had a de facto wife, Monica Madeline Armadale, and a son, Arthur Armadale, born in 1913.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he sailed with the 20th Battalion to the Western Front. In October 1917, less than two months after his arrival to the front, he was killed at the battle for Passchendaele in Belgium.

Kustaa Wilhelmi Myllymaki

  • Kustaa Wilhelmi Myllymaki, a Finnish seaman, came to Sydney from America in July 1916. He was married and his wife remained in Finland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he sailed with the reinforcements to the 30th Battalion to the Western Front, but got sick in England and was returned to Australia as medically unfit.
  • After the war he stayed in Sydney, and becoming paralysed, was unable to receive a pension from the Repatriation Department. He died in 1925.

Nicholas Evert

  • Nicholas Evert came from Gdov in St Petersburg Province; his father was Estonian and his mother was Russian. As a seaman he spent over ten years in the USA and Canada, arriving in South Australia in October 1916.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served with the Machine Gun Battalions on the Western Front.
  • After the war he worked as a labourer in Victoria and South Australia, becoming a member of the Socialist Labour Party. He died in 1927.

Peter Tkachuk

  • Peter Tkachuk, a Ukrainian from Dubno in Volyn Province, was a blacksmith and a seaman by trade. He deserted his ship in Australia in October 1916.
  • He served in the 2nd and 7th Light Horse regiments in Egypt and Palestine as a trooper and was later transferred to the 9th Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he continued working as a sailor, but got sick and spent the rest of his days at the Gladesville Mental Hospital, NSW, where he died in 1926.

Zundolovich, Skalberg, Timofejeff, Tamminen

January 2, 2017

Paul Ephriam Zundolovich

  • Paul Ephriam Zundolovich was born in a Jewish family in Telshai district in Lithuania, was baptised, and studied in Rome to become a Roman Catholic priest. He came to Australia in 1892 and worked in outback NSW.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he accompanied Australian troops to England as a chaplain.
  • After the war he continued his work in outback NSW.

John Skalberg

  • John Skalberg, a Latvian from Wolmar (Valmiera), who also claimed to be born in St Petersburg, graduated from high school in Russia. By the time of his enlistment in the AIF he was living in Melbourne, working as a labourer.
  • He served with the Machine Gun Companies on the Western Front. In May 1918 he was wounded at Camiers and, after months in hospitals and in the Depot, returned to Australia.
  • After the war he settled in Melbourne, where he was working as a salesman. In 1929 he married an Australian girl, Helen McFadyen. During WWII he enlisted in the AIF and served as a clerk in the Account section.

Alexander Timofejeff

  • Alexander Timofejeff, a Russian from Petrograd, enlisted in the AIF in Sydney.
  • He was allocated to the 13th Battalion, but discharged in March 1917.
  • After the war he disappears from the records.

Frans Victor Tamminen

  • Frans Victor Tamminen, a Finnish carpenter, probably came to Australia as a seaman.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne, he served with the 4th Australian Light Horse regiment in Egypt. He was wounded in May 1918, but continued his service.
  • He died soon after returning from the war in 1920.

Huhta, Pieven, Didenko, Shulgen

December 26, 2016

August Arthur Huhta

  • August Arthur Huhta, a Finnish seaman from Helsingfors, landed in Australia in April 1916 deserting his ship in Melbourne. Before his enlistment in the AIF he worked as a labourer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Sydney, he left his unit five months later and was discharged as a deserter.
  • He continued working as a fireman after leaving the AIF.

Zacharias Pieven

  • Zacharias Pieven came from a Cossack family in the township of Saltykova Divitsa in Chernigov Province. He worked as fitter and mechanic in Odessa, Nizhni Novgorod, and Harbin, where he married Klavdia Kroloiski. Pieven sailed to Australia in 1911 and his wife and newborn daughter soon joined him. They settled in Sydney, where their son was born in 1913, but a year later Klavdia tragically lost her life.
  • Zacharias, working as a fitter at the NSW Government Railway Workshops, enlisted in the AIF in November 1916, but was discharged as medically unfit on the same day. Five months later he died.
  • An Australian family brought up his children, who preserved the Zacharias family archive.

George Didenko

  • George Didenko was born in Akkerman (now Belgorod-Dnestrovsky, Ukraine). Working as a ships’ fireman, he came to South Australia in 1911.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Adelaide, he sailed to the front with the 5th Pioneer Battalion, but was found medically unfit while in England and returned to Australia.
  • After the war, George lived in Adelaide up to 1920, but after that he disappears from the Australia records; most likely he had left Australia for good.

Henry Shulgen

  • Henry Shulgen, a Polish Jew, by 1914 lived in Cairns working as an optician, watchmaker and jeweller. He tried to enlist in the AIF in April 1915 in Cairns, but was not successful.
  • Moving to Sydney, he married an Australian woman, Rachel Greenfield, and tried to enlist again in November 1916, but his service did not last long. His service records have not been found.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney, working as a jeweler.

Mentze, Seltin, Strauberg, Stenger

December 21, 2016

Alexander Mentze

  • Alexander Mentze, a Latvian seaman, came to South Australia with his Russian friends Edward Seltin and Oscar Strauberg in November 1916. They deserted ship and, under the pressure of the Russian consul, enlisted in the AIF a few days later.
  • Alexander was discharged from the army soon after enlistment because of an old injury to his elbow.
  • He subsequently worked in the coastal shipping of South Australia and New South Wales, settling in Sydney where he married an Australian woman, Mary Green.

Edward Ottomar Seltin

  • Edward Ottomar Seltin, a seaman from Rujenê in Latvia, served for two years on the ships in England before deserting his ship in Australia.
  • He served with the 5th Pioneer Battalion on the Western Front. In March 1918 he was wounded at Messines, but after recovering rejoined his battalion and served to the end of the war.
  • Settling in Sydney, he married an Australian girl, Florence Sherwood, and had a son Edward, who later recorded his memoirs. Seltin Sr worked as a coal lumper and later became a tram driver.

Oscar Strauberg

  • Oscar Strauberg, also a Latvian from Riga, served together with Seltin in the 5th Pioneer Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he worked on the coastal shipping out of Port Kembla until he lost his arm in an accident on a ship.

Fedor Stenger

  • Fedor Stenger, an artist (most likely a performer) from Riga, came to Australia not long before enlistment; his wife and two children stayed in Singapore and India, where earlier he was probably a planter.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne in October 1916 under the pressure of the Russian consulate, he was discharged a month later for family reasons. Nevertheless, going to Sydney, he re-enlisted a week later. He served with the 1st Pioneer Battalion on the Western Front until he was wounded in April 1918 at Hazebrouck.
  • He was returned to Australia and discharged in Sydney, but after that he disappears from the Australian records.