Tetoll, Bloom, Harsila, Andreson

September 26, 2015

Nicholas Tetoll

  • Nicholas Tetoll was born in Kostroma in Central Russia. He came to Australia via the Russian Far East in 1909. He worked on railway construction and as miner in Queensland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Rockhampton, he served as a sapper in the 1st Tunneling Company in the Western Front. In September 1917 he was wounded in the leg and evacuated to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Central Queensland, working as a labourer and occasionally being fined by the police for excessive drinking.

Samuel Bloom

  • Samuel Bloom, a Jewish man from the Plock area in Poland, first emigrated to England and in 1913 moved to Sydney, where he worked as a hairdresser and chiropodist.
  • After a month in the AIF he was discharged as unfit for military service. Shipping records of his arrival to Australia suggest that he was over fifty, being six years older than he claimed when enlisting in the AIF.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney and died in 1926; he was obviously lonely as his estate was managed by a public trustee.

Matti Harsila

  • Matti Harsila, a Finnish seaman from Lapua, came to Adelaide in September 1915 and enlisted in the AIF two weeks later.
  • He served with the 48th Battalion on the Western Front. He was wounded in August 1916, but remained on duty. In April 1917, at the Bullecourt advance, he was wounded in the left wrist and taken as a prisoner of war by the Germans. When he recovered, they used him at steel works near Essen.
  • After the war he was freed and visited his family in Finland, but in 1922 he returned to Australia, settling in North Queensland where he worked as a labourer and a cane cutter until in 1944 he was severely injured by an overturned cane truck. The last years he spent in Brisbane.

William Andreson

  • William Andreson, a seaman fron Piarnu in Estonia, enlisted in the AIF in Tasmania.
  • He served with the 26th Battalion on the Western Front.
  • After the war he continued his occupation as a sailor.

Preis, Miconi, Berk, Lindholm, Hulsen

September 22, 2015

Karl Preis

  • Karl Preis was a seaman from Pernau (Piarnu) in Estonia.
  • Enlisting in Lithgow in September 1915, he deserted two months later.
  • In the following years he worked in country New South Wales as a labourer, occasionally getting into trouble with the police for not registering as an alien.

Ivan Miconi

  • Ivan Miconi from Riga served in the Volunteer Russian Fleet and by 1915 was farming in Victoria and had a family.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne, he was allocated to the 1st Remount Unit, but upon reaching Egypt he was invalided to Australia because of his advanced age.
  • After the war he lived in Adelaide with his family and was one of the organisers of the Russian Citizens’ Association there.

Leo Berk

  • Leo Berk was born in Belostok in Grodno Province (now Poland) and might have been of Belorussian or Jewish origin, but after his service in the Russian Army in the Russo-Japanese war he seems to have become Russianised and upon arrival to Brisbane in 1913 was a part of the Russian community there. He worked as a labourer in different parts of Queensland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served as a gunner in the 4th Field Artillery Brigade on the Western Front. In May 1917 he was gassed and soon afterwards became sick and was evacuated to Australia.
  • During the Russian Revolution of 1917 he expressed more conservative positions and was at odds with the Russian community in Brisbane. Marrying a German woman, Margarite Stuewe in 1921, he moved to the Tumoulin – Ravenshoe area in North Queensland, working as labourer and millhand there and actively supporting the local RSSILA.

John Lindholm

  • John Lindholm was a Finnish seaman from Abo.
  • He served on the Western Front with the 54th Battalion. In October 1918 he was killed during the attack on the Hindenburg Line.
  • His brothers were found after the war in the USA.

Alexander Hulsen

  • Alexander Hulsen was a seaman from Riga.
  • He served with the 47th Battalion on the Western Front and was killed in June 1917 at Messines.
  • His Australian friend Charles Lawrence could not provide any information about his family when the Australian authorities tried to locate them.

Bevolsky, Paltie, Markoff, Johnson, Janshewsky

September 19, 2015

Paul Bernard Bevolsky

  • Paul Bernard Bevolsky from Piarnu in Estonia served in Russia on submarine miners. He came to Australia in 1911 and worked in Sydney as a storeman.
  • He served with the 1st Battalion on the Western Front. In August 1916 he was wounded in the wrist and forearm at the battle for Pozieres. Evacuated to an English hospital, he continued his service in Britain, being appointed temporary sergeant in 1918.
  • While in Britain he married an English woman, Harriet Elizabeth Bowes, a widow with two children, whose husband had been killed during the war. In 1920 they all left for Australia, where their son Harry was born in 1920. They settled in Wentworth Falls, where Paul worked as a gardener. In 1924 his wife died, leaving him with three children. Paul changed his name to Bowes and later moved to Sydney, where he worked as a storeman. His son Harry served in the AIF in the WWII and was killed in Egypt.

Samuel Paltie

  • Samuel Paltie, a Jewish man from Talsen in Latvia, first moved to Glasgow in Scotland and in 1901 came to Australia with his wife Ada and two children Martha and Joseph. They lived in Sydney where Samuel had a secondhand shop on Campbell Street.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in September 1915, he was discharged two months later at his wife’s request. His son Joseph, born in Scotland, enlisted in the AIF at the end of war but was too late to be sent overseas.
  • After the war Samuel lived in Sydney and Brisbane, continuing his business.

Makar Markoff

  • Makar Markoff from Melikhovo in Kursk Province left Russia when he was a teenager and worked as a fireman on the ships. He came to Australia not long before the war.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served in the artillery units as a driver on the Western Front.
  • After the war, spending a few years in Australia, he returned to Russia, where he received Australian pension until it was stopped in 1937 and trace of him was lost.

John Johnson

  • John Johnson, a seaman from Riga, worked in Coonabarabran in NSW as a labourer.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Dubbo, he served with the 20th Battalion on the Western Front. He was wounded in the head during the advance in March 1917. Recovering, he returned to his unit and was wounded once again, in the battle for Mennin Road, at Ypres, and again to the head. After the second wound he was evacuated to Australia.
  • After the war he worked as a wharf labourer in Sydney and later moved to Brisbane.

Edward Rudolph Janshewsky

  • Edward Rudolph Janshewsky, a fireman from Libava (Liepaja) in Latvia, came to Australia in July 1915 and enlisted in the AIF two months later.
  • He served with the 1st Pioneer Battalion on the Western Front, but his servive was marked with numerous AWLs and two court-martials, so that he was not eligible for war medals.
  • After the war he married a woman from New Zealand, Signa Hansen, and settled down in Sydney working as a bootmaker. Here he played in the Workers’ Art Club performances. During WWII he enlisted in the AIF once again, working in a boot repair section.

Korniack, Loginoff, Semenkin, Johnson, Jorgensen

September 15, 2015

Afanasey Korniack

  • Affanasey Korniack, a Ukrainian from Poritsk in Volyn Province, fought in the Russo-Japanese War. He came to Townsville from the Russian Far East not long before WWI broke out. By that time he was nearly forty, being a widover with two children left behind in Russia. He had the trade of a machinist and worked in the mines in Cloncurry and Friezland as a miner.
  • In September 1915 he enlisted in the AIF in Townsville together with two Russians, Loginoff and Semenkin. His service was not long, and although he reenlisted in February 1916 in Brisbane, he was discharged in April of the same year as medically unfit.
  • After the war he worked in North Queensland as an engineer and fitter, later moving to Brisbane where he worked at a meatworks. For six years he attempted to receive naturalisation in Australia, but was refused because the security officers had suspicions about his belonging to the Russian Association and ties with Communists. He finally succeeded in 1930.

George Loginoff

  • George Loginoff from Kotelnich in Viatka Province, leaving Russia, spent two years in England, France, and Alaska, arriving in Brisbane in 1913. He worked as a labourer in Friezeland.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served as a gunner in the Division Ammunition Column on the Western Front. In October 1916 he received a contusion to the face and in November 1917 he was gassed at Passchendaele. He experienced deafness and was evacuated to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Brisbane and Cairns. In 1921 he was naturalised and disappers from the records after that. It is most likely that he returned to Russia.

Paul Semenkin

  • Paul Semenkin, from Paluzh in Mogilev Province in Belarus, came to Australia in 1914 and worked in the mines in Friezland with Korniak and Loginoff.
  • He was discharged from the AIF soon after enlistment, suffering from rheumatism.
  • In 1916 he worked in Paraparap in the Northern Territory, but disappears from records after that.

Harry Johnson

  • Harry Johnson from Perrynory near Riga in Latvia was a ship’s carpenter. He stated that he naturalised in the USA. In 1912 he came to Port Melbourne and worked on coastal boats, and then on a farm in Cheltenham.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Melbourne he was transferred for training to Bendigo, where he deserted.
  • He disappears from the records after that.

Carl Jorgensen

  • Carl Jorgensen from Finland came to Australia in 1907, probably as a seaman. Here he worked as a labourer and stockman in Prosperine in North Queensland. In 1913 he married an Australian girl, Agnes McKinney.
  • Enlisting in the AIF in Rockhampton he served as a bombardier in the artillery units on the Western Front. In February 1918 he was gassed, but rejoined the unit. In October 1918 he was on leave in the UK where he contracted influenza and died a week later in the Military Hospital in Hamilton in Scotland, just five days before the armistice.

Tanne, Rothman, Simula, Sjomlom, Anderson

September 10, 2015

Michael Tanne

  • Michael Tanne, an Estonian seaman from Piarnu, came to Australia in 1911 and worked as a labourer in South Australia.
  • Soon after enlistment in the AIF he was found sick with TB, discharged from the army a year later, and died soon afterwards.

Leon Rothman

  • Leon Rothman, a young Jewish man born in Odessa, came to Australia in 1914 with his parents and lived in Brisbane learning the trade of a jeweller.
  • He enlisted in the AIF, but was soon discharged when his commander learned that he was just 19 and did not have the consent of his parents.
  • In 1917 he married a Jewish girl from Melitopol, Elsie Meerkin, and had a large family. First he worked in Brisbane as a salesman, but by 1930 he moved to Sydney, where he found employment as a painter.

Toivo Jala Simula

  • Toivo Jala Simula, a Finnish seaman from Helsingfors (Helsinki) came to Australia in September 1915 and enlisted in the AIF a few days later in Melbourne.
  • He sailed with the 5th Battalion to the Western Front, but there his service did not go right, he was court martialled for disobedience three times and had numerous AWLs. When he finally reached the trenches he was wounded at the Amiens advance in August 1918 and returned to Australia.
  • After the war he lived in Sydney, periodically getting into trouble with the police, until, in 1932, he married an Australian woman, Agnes Frances Leighton.

Alexander Alfred Sjoblom

  • Alexander Alfred Sjoblom, another Finn, from Genbole, came to Australia in 1906 and worked in Australia as a miner.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served through the war as a gunner on the Western Front.
  • After the war he farmed in country NSW, specialising as a viticulturalist.

Ernest Anderson

  • Ernest Anderson, a seaman from Riga, came to Western Australia in 1910 and worked as a sleeper hewer.
  • He served with the 11th Battalion on the Western Front and was killed in action in July 1916 at Pozieres.
  • His mother in Riga was found after the war.

 

Thaler, Breitman, Jaffe, Kivovitch, Borg

September 4, 2015

Gustav Thaler

  • Gustav Thaler, born in Warsaw, was of German-Polish origin. He came to Queensland in 1891 as a child with his family. He lived in Charters Towers, Blackall and Brisbane, working as a labourer and a cook.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he came with the 31st Battalion to Egypt, but got a hernia and was returned to Australia as medically unfit.
  • After the war he married an Australian girl, Eva Scriven, and was farming at Beerburrum, and later moved to Ipswich.

George Breitman

  • George (Girsh) Breitman, a young Jewish man from Chechelnik in Podolsk Province in Ukraine, probably came to Australia from England, where his relatives lived.
  • He served with the 3rd Battalion on the Western Front. In April 1917 he was awarded the Military Medal for bravery in the field, saving his officer’s life and assisting in the capture of four enemies. In October 1917 he was wounded in the hand at Broodseinde near Ypres. In August 1918 he was gassed, but rejoined his battalion after recovery and was in the field on the day of the armistice.
  • In April 1919 he contracted pneumonia, was transferred to a hospital in England, and died a week later.

Phillip Jaffe

  • Phillip Jaffe, a Jewish man from Kovno (Kaunas) in Lithuania, first migrated to South Africa and served in the South African Army. In June 1915 he came to Australia working his passage, and enlisted in the AIF two months later.
  • He service did not go well; he was absent without leave several times and deserted in December 1915. Being apprehended, he was court martialled and sentenced to 60 days of imprisonment.
  • He disappears from Australian records after that.

Yur Kivovitch

  • Yur Kivovitch, born in Odessa, came from a large Jewish family, which migrated to Palestine soon after 1905. From there Yur, who knew a number of languages, went to China, India and Hong Kong. He came to Townsville in 1913 and worked as a collector of customs and refreshment room keeper there.
  • Enlisting in the AIF, he served in Egypt in the Camel Transport Corps as a Quartermaster Sergeant and later in the Censor’s office of the Australian HQ in Cairo.
  • After the war he worked in South Australia as a commercial traveller, and later as a merchant and manufacturer. In 1931 he left for Canada. Twenty years later he returned to Australia and lived in Sydney, working as a restaurant proprietor.

Charles Leonard Borg

  • Charles Leonard Borg, born in Helsingfors (Helsinki) in Finland, was a train conductor. He came to Western Australia in 1913 and worked as a timber worker.
  • He served as a sapper in the 3rd Field Company Engineers, attaining the rank of Lance-Corporal. He was killed in April 1918 near Amiens.
  • His family in Finland was found after the war.